Subnet CIDR Coverage Calculator

Oh no…. Not another CIDR calculator, because there really are a bunch.

Allow me to advocate for my app CIDRizer, focused on CIDR space coverage. If one has a CIDR block (account, VPC, etc.), and their engineers take a little slice here and there (of varying mask size and probably not consecutive), how can one actually see what’s left?

Example (CIDRizer input):

10.10.10.0/24   # Overall Account/VPC

10.10.10.32/29  # Jim's tests
10.10.10.128/29 # dev4a
10.10.10.160/28 # Ruth's team

… can be completely covered/represented as follows (CIDRizer output):

Account

CIDR2^(32-n)Avail.FirstLast
10.10.10.0/2425625410.10.10.010.10.10.255

Simplest Coverage CIDR Blocking (SCCB)

CIDR2^(32-n)Avail.FirstLast
10.10.10.0/27323010.10.10.010.10.10.31
10.10.10.32/298610.10.10.3210.10.10.39
10.10.10.40/298610.10.10.4010.10.10.47
10.10.10.48/28161410.10.10.4810.10.10.63
10.10.10.64/26646210.10.10.6410.10.10.127
10.10.10.128/298610.10.10.12810.10.10.135
10.10.10.136/298610.10.10.13610.10.10.143
10.10.10.144/28161410.10.10.14410.10.10.159
10.10.10.160/28161410.10.10.16010.10.10.175
10.10.10.176/28161410.10.10.17610.10.10.191
10.10.10.192/26646210.10.10.19210.10.10.255

Algorithm & Code

I have made the repository public, with an ISC license. This unit test file details what the core algorithm is doing (and can be run via npm test), the rest of the project’s code is simply enabling it as a NodeJS web app.

Run / Deploy

As usual npm start, but there’s a serverless.yml which is what I’ve used to deploy it to my domain CIDRizer.com.

That’s it. My contribution to the CIDR calculator space.

Advent of Code 2020: Day 18 Order of Operations (Arithmetic)

As I had written in a previous blog post, I participated in the Advent of Code, 25 programming problems to help improve my skills. I maintained really good momentum through day 20 before holiday activities forced me to pause. (Bonus: I have 5 really solid problems to play with for the next month.)

One of the best aspects of such a side activity is discussing the problems with some of my colleagues, and seeing the different approaches. It was important we treated the discussion as a open and safe space. Of course there are wrong answers, the underlying problem needs to be solved. But there are many different ways to approach and implement the solution including non-optimal ones. It was not meant to be a code golf challenge: rather by experimenting with unfamiliar aspects of our programming languages and solving abstract problems, we deepened our expertise.

I particularly enjoyed problem Day 18. Perhaps you remember your PEMDAS (order of arithmetic operations) from junior high. The Day 18 problem jumbled the notion of PEMDAS and asked to evaluate expressions if operations were evaluated “strictly left to right” or “addition comes before multiplication.” (The horror…)

My solution involved mapping the ‘depth’ of an expression wrt parentheses, then building a method to do the custom expression evaluation. Wrapping the two in iteration, I could then slice, divide, and conquer the expression to obtain the final result. Here’s an example of an expression, where the updated depth map is followed by the sliced expression selected for evaluation and finally replaced. This keeps drilling down until the entire expression has been evaluated:

### addition before multiplication ###

 (3+6+7+9)*(2+(4*7*6+9+3+5)+9+(2+3+7+4+3)+9)+8

"(3+6+7+9)*(2+(4*7*6+9+3+5)+9+(2+3+7+4+3)+9)+8"
 111111111011122222222222221112222222222211100
               4*7*6+9+3+5
               644
              ___
"(3+6+7+9)*(2+644+9+(2+3+7+4+3)+9)+8"
 11111111101111111112222222222211100
                     2+3+7+4+3
                     19
                    __
"(3+6+7+9)*(2+644+9+19+9)+8"
 11111111101111111111111100
  3+6+7+9
  25
 __ 
"25*(2+644+9+19+9)+8"
 0001111111111111100
     2+644+9+19+9
     683
    ___
"25*683+8"

line_value: 17275 

How did my colleagues approach this?

  • David – used a clever regex to find the ‘deepest’ pair of parentheses, then evaluated the contained expression, and repeat as long as there was a ‘(‘ character remaining in the expression.
  • Josh – employed a similar regex recognition, but wrapped his solution in a very tidy `map()` for an almost minified look. By using less memory, Josh is minimizing his electricity consumption and saving the environment!

Advent of Code 2020: A Challenge Ahead of the Holidays

It’s important to continually hone your own skills true to being a true professional. Credit to my colleague David Lozzi for bringing Advent of Code 2020 to my attention, to which I immediately knew I had to partake.

Daily coding challenges are posted while the site interweaves some stats, socialization, and leader boards. My personal goals:

  • Complete all 25 challenges
  • Try a new language for at least one challenge

For example, the Day 3 challenge: ‘ski’ down a grid thousands of lines long and count the number of trees encountered for a specified slope…

Please check out my solutions on GitHub (all JS so far, and my solution to the Day 3 challenge) or follow along. After only three days I’ve already found it incredible revealing to see how my fellow Slalom colleagues have solved the same problem with different languages, approaches, and personal coding style.

Happy Coding!

Merry Christmas!

Happy New Year!